Dora Wirth Languages | Pharmaceutical Translations https://www.dwlanguages.com Need global life science solutions? Rely on us. Problem solved. Tue, 31 Oct 2017 13:39:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.3 What Makes A Good Translation for Regulatory Submission (And How To Avoid Being Let Down) https://www.dwlanguages.com/makes-good-translation-regulatory-submission-avoid-let/ https://www.dwlanguages.com/makes-good-translation-regulatory-submission-avoid-let/#respond Tue, 31 Oct 2017 13:12:52 +0000 http://www.dwlanguages.com/?p=2048 When you’ve worked hard to build your reputation, the last thing you need is your translation service provider letting you down. Without a full understanding of what makes a good translation, selecting your provider can quite literally be a gamble - especially with any extra costs associated with delays to submissions. To take the risk

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When you’ve worked hard to build your reputation, the last thing you need is your translation service provider letting you down. Without a full understanding of what makes a good translation, selecting your provider can quite literally be a gamble - especially with any extra costs associated with delays to submissions. To take the risk out of regulatory translations, we’d like to share the most important factors in ensuring you get a good translation.

First things first - the highest-quality translations for submission to the EMA will always come from a highly qualified, experienced translator with the relevant medical and scientific knowledge. If you find yourself looking to cut costs by sourcing less experienced translators who don’t specialize in translating for the medical/pharmaceutical industry, think twice. Inaccurate and inconsistent translations will cost you far more in the long run. Any rejection of a translated PI at the last hurdle of your MA application not only reflects poorly on your reputation, but there is also the risk to patient safety to consider, should any errors slip through unnoticed. A specialist provider understands the serious implications of any errors or ambiguities, so you can have peace of mind knowing there will be a thorough and extensive quality control process in place.

Secondly, the best translations will come from providers with extensive experience in regulatory processes. All professionals involved in the translation process should have an excellent knowledge of the regulatory framework, documents and procedures. An in-depth understanding of your job means that your provider has a clear and supportive grasp of your needs and expectations, for example knowing when and how to use key terminology. They should demonstrate sound knowledge of the appropriate terminology and regulatory standard text and an awareness of the regulatory timetable and implications of out-of-scope changes to product information during variations or last-minute requests in the 5-day window.

As well as understanding the medical, scientific and regulatory standards and expectations, it is essential for your provider to have linguistic competence in both source and target languages. It really pays to check that your translators are required to translate into their mother tongue only. Translations provided by non-native speakers of the target language are likely to sound stilted, wooden and non-idiomatic, no matter how competent the linguist is. Note that the ISO translation standard 17100 imposes no requirement of using native speakers of the target language, so do check with your language service provider.

No matter how well your linguists rank on linguistic competency and knowledge of the subject matter, let’s not forget that accuracy is of the essence. This includes a faithful translation of the approved core text and consistent style that adheres to the conventions and expectations of the relevant regulatory bodies. Make sure your translation provider has robust and meaningful quality-control measures in place that aren’t relying purely on mechanical tools.

You may think it is fair to assume that all translations are fed into a machine these days, but in fact it is only careful (not universal) use of translation software that can guarantee quality and consistency, when overseen by human professionals with skill and experience in their subject matter.

Finding a service you can truly rely on will give you peace of mind for your submissions (let’s face it, they are stressful enough), making it easy to convince your procurement department of the worthwhile investment.

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BREXIT: WHAT LIES AHEAD FOR THE UK LIFE SCIENCES SECTOR? https://www.dwlanguages.com/brexit-lies-ahead-uk-life-sciences-sector/ https://www.dwlanguages.com/brexit-lies-ahead-uk-life-sciences-sector/#respond Thu, 02 Feb 2017 10:30:46 +0000 http://www.dwlanguages.com/?p=2004 BREXIT: What lies ahead for the UK Life Sciences sector? DWL has received several questions about Brexit recently from translators but there is currently little hard information we can give them. What we do know from the government is that Brexit means Brexit...but Brexit means what for the UK's life sciences sector? This was one

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BREXIT: What lies ahead for the UK Life Sciences sector?

DWL has received several questions about Brexit recently from translators but there is currently little hard information we can give them. What we do know from the government is that Brexit means Brexit...but Brexit means what for the UK's life sciences sector? This was one of the topics covered in a 2-day meeting of the Clinical & Contract Research Association (CCRA) held at the Royal Society of Medicine in London on 24 and 25 January 2017 and attended by the CEO of DWL, Samuel J. Wirth, and the Medical Director, Dr Iain Matheson.

 

Day 1 (entitled UK Clinical Research: A Professional Awareness Update) began with a talk by Matthew Speers, CEO of the Life Sciences Organisation, part of the Department for International Trade. He pointed out that the life sciences sector in the UK is very vibrant, with 220,000 employees, more than 5600 companies and a turnover of £61 billion and emphasised the need to promote the UK and to drive inward investment. Many overseas companies (especially in the US) see the UK as the natural stepping stone into Europe but this advantage has now been lost with Brexit, possibly to the benefit of Ireland or Germany. The role of the Medicines and Health Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) will need to evolve – will it develop closer relationships with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or relationships outside the EU (e.g. with Australia and New Zealand)? Questions for which there are not yet any answers... There is also uncertainty over what the US approach will be, now that Donald Trump is in the White House. Matthew Speers pointed out that the National Health Service (NHS) should be viewed as an asset, but that there might not be the necessary skills available due to the immigration policy post-Brexit. Over the two days, many speakers and delegates referred to the NHS as a "unique selling point" for the UK life sciences sector because of the availability of a huge amount of data in a single organisation.

 

Dr Martin O'Kane, Head of the Clinical Trials Unit at the MHRA, provided an update on the progress of the new EU Clinical Trials Regulation on Day 1. The need for a regulation has arisen from the failings of the Clinical Trials Directive, which has in some ways hampered research. The regulation will not become effective until the EU portal for processing clinical trial applications and the database have been audited and found to be suitable. User testing on the portal is currently taking place and will continue in 2017. The audit is scheduled for autumn this year. If the audit outcome is favourable, the EU Clinical Trials Regulation will come into effect by October 2018. It is unclear how Brexit will affect implementation in the UK. It is possible that the regulation will roll-over after any repeal act especially as the regulation contains many proposals favoured by the UK. As with all things Brexit, only time will tell...

 

A show of hands at the start of Day 2 entitled UK Clinical Research: The Landscape for CROs Post-Brexit indicated that most attendees thought that the UK would weather the Brexit storm and that it was not all doom and gloom. Professor Richard Barker, OBE, Director of the Centre for the Advancement and Sustainability of Medical Innovation, pointed out that the UK has some of the world's top clinicians, that with the fall in the pound's value the UK has become a cheaper market and that being a relatively small market the UK needs to be distinctive. The attractiveness of the UK as a place for life sciences organisations to do business needs to be promoted.

 

Professor Angus Dalgleish, Professor of Oncology at St George's Hospital, London, and an unsuccessful parliamentary candidate for UKIP in the 2015 General Election, offered a different view. He felt Brexit had led to a lot of hysteria and that it offered tremendous opportunities for the life sciences sector in the UK. He pointed out that the training of doctors had suffered because of the European Working Time Directive as it deprived them of valuable clinical experience and that the EU Clinical Trials Directive had been detrimental to clinical research in the UK, especially as it was interpreted very rigorously here and had meant some research had had to be abandoned. He reminded us that long before the Maastricht and Lisbon treaties there had been a lot of cooperation at European level, such as the European Space Agency, the European Molecular Biology Laboratory, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and, of course, Concorde and Airbus.

 

Stephen Dorrell, Chair of the NHS Confederation and a former Secretary of State for Health in John Major's government in the 1990s, rounded off the Brexit debate. He believed that a quick, innovative and flexible approach to clinical trials was needed so that patients can benefit internationally. A nationalistic regulatory view is therefore contrary to his belief that innovations in healthcare should be implemented as widely as possible. As he sees it, an international research environment functions best and this of course requires the availability of a skilled workforce, something that is likely to be a stumbling block if a more rigorous immigration policy is enforced post-Brexit. He tempered the enthusiasm of some of the delegates about the NHS. Although it is a key national idea, in Dorrell's view, the NHS should be viewed not as a single organisation but as many smaller organisations.

 

We hope to be able to give an update on the implications of Brexit later in the year.

Brexit

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DWL is hiring: Full time Project Manager required https://www.dwlanguages.com/dwl-hiring-full-time-project-manager-required/ https://www.dwlanguages.com/dwl-hiring-full-time-project-manager-required/#respond Tue, 17 Jan 2017 07:38:23 +0000 http://www.dwlanguages.com/?p=1992 DWL is hiring! We are looking for an experienced Project Manager to provide extra support for a busy translation service provider specialising in the life sciences. Job description: As a Project Manager at DWL you will: Operate within DWL’s quality management system and ISO 9001 certification. Handle key accounts as part of the project management

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DWL is hiring!

We are looking for an experienced Project Manager to provide extra support for a busy translation service provider specialising in the life sciences.

Job description:

As a Project Manager at DWL you will:

  • Operate within DWL’s quality management system and ISO 9001 certification.
  • Handle key accounts as part of the project management team.
  • Be responsible for quotations, order handling and quality control of the translations.
  • Be working on projects in the medical / pharmaceutical field, including regulatory projects for submission to the European Medicines Agency (involving up to 24 languages).
  • Set up and process all compatible translation projects in memoQ.
  • Be responsible for the final MS-Word processing of the translations to ensure that they respect either the original format or the standard requested by the client.
  • When required, work paid overtime (evenings, occasional weekends).

 

Profile:

  • We are looking for a committed and dynamic person with excellent communication skills and strong knowledge of both spoken and written English and project management experience of ideally 2 years or more.
  • Languages: knowledge of at least 2 European languages other than English is essential, and some understanding of the nature of scientific publications and documents, particularly regulatory/pharmaceutical/medical documentation, is a bonus.
  • Regulatory: familiarity with EMA templates and standard terminology for this type of documentation would be ideal but is not essential.
  • Accuracy: accurate and thorough quality control is essential to ensure that all the material delivered to clients complies with DWL quality standards.
  • IT: computer literacy and strong MS-Word processing skills are essential as the project management occasionally requires the preparation/finalisation of layout/format for the translated documents. Must be experienced in working with a CAT tool (preferably memoQ).
  • Desirable: flexibility and positive thinking to work in a small busy team always striving to find creative solutions to optimise client and translator satisfaction whilst working in an enjoyable environment.

 

Start date:

ASAP

 

The Team:

Based in Hammersmith, we are a team of 12 staff.

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New Arrival: Kate Harvey https://www.dwlanguages.com/new-arrival-kate-harvey/ https://www.dwlanguages.com/new-arrival-kate-harvey/#respond Thu, 26 May 2016 11:20:35 +0000 http://www.dwlanguages.com/?p=1627 As 2016 rolls firmly on, it's time to introduce another new arrival to our team with whom you may not yet be familiar. Kate Harvey joined us in October 2015 as Project Support Assistant, and has supported the DWL Project Management team in diverse ways ever since. From aligning translation memories to performing visual checks on Product Information, Kate's first

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As 2016 rolls firmly on, it's time to introduce another new arrival to our team with whom you may not yet be familiar. Kate Harvey joined us in October 2015 as Project Support Assistant, and has supported the DWL Project Management team in diverse ways ever since. From aligning translation memories to performing visual checks on Product Information, Kate's first year has been varied, and our team has already benefited from her focused work ethic and unflappable nature.

As is now customary, we thought we would ask some searching and personal questions and find out what makes Kate tick.

DWL: Where do you call home, Kate?

I grew up on a Devonshire Dairy farm, amongst a big family, and even more cows and fields, so I think that will always be home for me. However, I also enjoyed living in Birmingham, sunny Spain and not-so-sunny Portugal as part of my 4 year degree at the University of Birmingham. Since joining the DWL team in October 2015 I have lived in London and I am currently relishing exploring all that the city has to offer.

DWL: Which languages do you speak?

I am a native English speaker and also speak Spanish and Portuguese thanks to my four-year Hispanic Studies degree. Spanish is my particular strength having spent some time prior to my Erasmus year working as an au pair in Spain. I hugely enjoyed living in Valencia, Spain and then Coimbra, Portugal during my year studying abroad and found these the most valuable experiences for language learning. My appreciation for the distinct cultures of the two countries (and climates!) has inspired my ambition to pursue a career in languages.

DWL: When did you perform your first ever translation and can you remember what it was about?

I performed my first translation project from Spanish to English in final year at University, through a module entitled Translation Theory and Practice. Our task was to pick a passage of 1000 words, which had to be as bizarre and as complex as possible, and translate it alongside an analytical commentary to justify our translation decisions. I really enjoyed the project, and chose a section from crime fiction author Eduardo Mendoza’s  ‘El laberinto de las aceitunas’ (really quite a strange yet enjoyable read, if anyone is considering). It was certainly challenging translating analogies and irony which relied upon their cultural roots for comic effect. However, it gave me a great insight into the many challenges involved in creating a quality translation and in the end I was glad to have chosen such a difficult, niche passage to translate.

DWL: How easy/difficult was it to find work after University?

After thoroughly enjoying my languages degree, especially the modules in translation, I was sure I wanted to learn more about the translation industry. Through my research I found a concentration of translation companies in London and was excited by the prospect of moving to the 'Big Smoke'. My attention was initially drawn to DWL due to their specific focus on the interesting field of medical translation, along with their promise of a highly professional yet personable service. After a couple of months of searching and submitting applications, I was thrilled to be offered a translation aptitude test by DWL. I was travelling through Europe at the time, but thankfully the shaky Wi-Fi at an internet cafe in the South of France pulled through and I was offered a 3 month internship. The DWL team made me feel very welcome and having gladly accepted a permanent contract after my internship, I am enjoying the increasing responsibility and learning curve of the transition from learning translation theory, to managing translation projects in practice.

DWL: What’s your favourite pastime?

I enjoy keeping active, and I’m a big fan of the beach and the outdoors. I’m also a lover of music, and frequently go to concerts and gigs. So in a nutshell, a run along the coast whilst listening to some good music is probably one of my favourite things to do.

DWL: Did you make a new year’s resolution for 2016, and have you managed to keep it?

I´m not one for making huge life-altering changes at New Year, and I am certainly not going to be giving up chocolate any time soon, but I have made a conscious effort to get into healthy, interesting cooking. Inspired by the innumerable food markets of my new hometown, I have produced some good and some not-so-good experimental dishes. Highlights have included sweet potato brownies, courgette and chocolate cake and, most recently, coconut, cashew and date energy bars which powered my sister and I through the Bath Half Marathon.

DWL: Who is your hero?

Although perhaps lesser known than Nelson Mandela and Mother Teresa, Granny Harvey is without a doubt my most influential heroine. She’s nearly 84, walks absolutely miles over rolling hills every day (never without her hyperactive Jack Russell by her side, as none of her friends can keep up), is the bubbliest person I know, and is not on one bit of medication! She truly inspires me to appreciate the vitality of life.

Thank you, Kate!

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DWL are exhibiting at BioTrinity 2016 https://www.dwlanguages.com/biotrinity-2016/ https://www.dwlanguages.com/biotrinity-2016/#respond Fri, 22 Apr 2016 15:21:03 +0000 http://www.dwlanguages.com/?p=1591 Next week (26th & 27th April) you'll find DWL exhibiting at BioTrinity 2016 - Europe's leading investment and biopartnering conference. We're on stand number 39 in the exhibition hall. The floorplan can be found here: http://www.biotrinity.com/sites/default/files/BioTrinity%202016%20Exhibition%20Floor%20Plan%20Zoned_0.pdf Kim and Beatriz look forward to meeting you there!   For more information, please see: http://www.biotrinity.com/

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Next week (26th & 27th April) you'll find DWL exhibiting at BioTrinity 2016 - Europe's leading investment and biopartnering conference.

We're on stand number 39 in the exhibition hall.

The floorplan can be found here:

http://www.biotrinity.com/sites/default/files/BioTrinity%202016%20Exhibition%20Floor%20Plan%20Zoned_0.pdf

Kim and Beatriz look forward to meeting you there!

 

For more information, please see: http://www.biotrinity.com/

BioTrinity 2016

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DIA EuroMeeting 2016 https://www.dwlanguages.com/dia-euromeeting-2016/ https://www.dwlanguages.com/dia-euromeeting-2016/#respond Mon, 04 Apr 2016 14:58:04 +0000 http://www.dwlanguages.com/?p=1570 Join DWL at the 28th Annual DIA Euromeeting, being held from the 6th to 8th April in Hamburg, Germany. The theme for the DIA EuroMeeting 2016 is "INnovation: Do You Win by Being IN? — In a world in which new therapies are being developed at a phenomenal rate, is innovation always the answer?" DWL will

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Join DWL at the 28th Annual DIA Euromeeting, being held from the 6th to 8th April in Hamburg, Germany.

The theme for the DIA EuroMeeting 2016 is "INnovation: Do You Win by Being IN? — In a world in which new therapies are being developed at a phenomenal rate, is innovation always the answer?"

DWL will be exhibiting on Stand K4. Please stop by to say hello and to chat to us about the challenges you are facing with your multilingual healthcare content.

DIA EuroMeeting 2016

 

Why attend the DIA EuroMeeting 2016? Read more here: http://www.diaglobal.org/en/flagship/euromeeting-2016/about/why-attend

 

 

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STUMBLING ON SUCCESS: Drugs discovered by accident https://www.dwlanguages.com/drugs-discovered-by-accident/ https://www.dwlanguages.com/drugs-discovered-by-accident/#respond Thu, 03 Mar 2016 17:37:17 +0000 http://www.dwlanguages.com/?p=1563 STUMBLING ON SUCCESS: Drugs discovered by accident Just as new words are coined and old ones evolve, so too does medical science evolve and improve in a non-linear fashion. In fact there are many great discoveries in medicine which resulted from strange or unfortunate circumstances, or which ended up having very different applications to those

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STUMBLING ON SUCCESS: Drugs discovered by accident

Just as new words are coined and old ones evolve, so too does medical science evolve and improve in a non-linear fashion.

In fact there are many great discoveries in medicine which resulted from strange or unfortunate circumstances, or which ended up having very different applications to those originally intended.

For example:

Viagra (sildenafil citrate): One of the most famous modern accidental medical discoveries. The fastest selling drug of all time, this medicine is taken for erectile dysfunction, but it was originally prescribed for treatment of hypertension and angina. It is also used off-label as a cure for jet-lag! The drug is not without risk, however, as excessive use may cause deafness and/or blindness.

Minoxidil: This antihypertensive vasodilator medication was originally being tested on dogs as a treatment for ulcers. It failed to treat the ulcers, but instead was authorised by the FDA for testing as a treatment for hypertension, due to its powerful vasodilating properties. Subsequent studies with minoxidil showed unexpected hair growth in subjects, and today it is successfully used as the active ingredient in popular hair loss treatments.

Mustard gas (sulphur mustard): This blister-causing chemical is well known as a horrendous and damaging chemical warfare agent. However, did you know that tests on the white blood cell counts of mustard gas victims ultimately led physicians to discover its value as therapy for Hodgkin’s lymphoma? Eventually, a similar compound (nitrogen mustard) became the first cancer chemotherapy drug, marketed as Mustine.

Penicillin was among the first medicines to combat bacterial infections. Various scientists had noticed the curative properties of mould, and in 1928 Alexander Fleming reported that under the right conditions, Penicillium rubens would exude a substance with antibiotic properties. It is now the most commonly used antibiotic in the world!

Warfarin ‑ in the 1920s it was the scourge of livestock farms in North America and Canada and was later used as rat poison. Post-Depression farmers in North America and Canada, in those austere times, began letting their cattle graze on damp/mouldy sweet clover hay which in more affluent times would have been discarded. After previously healthy cattle began to die from bleeding, they discovered that coumarin found in the hay was to blame for what they had come to know as “sweet clover poisoning”. In 1948, it became used as a rodenticide, and was patented as “Warfarin”. Then in 1958, it was administered to General Dwight Eisenhower who had just suffered a myocardial infarction, and later proved in clinical trials to increase survival following deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Today it is the most widely prescribed oral anticoagulant drug in the US - all thanks to those few unfortunate cattle back in the 1920s! There is now a new generation of anticoagulants (factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors) which are proving to have some advantages for patients over warfarin.

Do you have any favourite drug discovery stories to share?

 

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Merry Christmas – here is DWL by numbers! https://www.dwlanguages.com/dwl_by_numbers/ https://www.dwlanguages.com/dwl_by_numbers/#respond Tue, 22 Dec 2015 10:47:29 +0000 http://www.dwlanguages.com/?p=1551 Christmas draws near, this was certainly our year - and here is DWL by numbers! 108 of our clients requested our services in 2015, resulting in… …1360 translation projects managed by DWL’s project management team this year alone! 2 new members of staff joined us this year! 2’184’000 steps (in total) were walked by participating members

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Christmas draws near, this was certainly our year - and here is DWL by numbers!

108 of our clients requested our services in 2015, resulting in…

1360 translation projects managed by DWL’s project management team this year alone!

2 new members of staff joined us this year!

2’184’000 steps (in total) were walked by participating members of DWL in September as part of the Steptember initiative, which means...

10’000 (or more) steps walked by each staff member per day

804 professional translation suppliers are now on our books

11 languages are spoken between DWL staff members, with a few more in the pipeline!

9001:2008 is the ISO quality management systems certification within which DWL operates as of 2015

1 doctor in the house! Our medical director (and translator) has continued to be invaluable for all things medical as well as linguistic

10 espressos were drunk per DWL employee per week this year. It’s best we don’t mention tea...

1 typewriter is kept permanently at DWL HQ

7 DWL employees were regular gym goers in 2015 – fingers crossed we keep it going in 2016!

53 is the number of years DWL has been established – post below if you can work out how many espressos we could consume in that time!

 

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Genesis 2015 https://www.dwlanguages.com/genesis-2015/ https://www.dwlanguages.com/genesis-2015/#respond Tue, 08 Dec 2015 15:52:19 +0000 http://www.dwlanguages.com/?p=1539 DWL will be exhibiting at One Nucleus' Genesis 2015 conference in London on Thursday 10th December. The theme of this year's Genesis event is “Taking Bio-Innovation to a Global Market”. The conference streams cover many topics, including: Deal Structures Empowering Technologies Nurturing an Innovation Pipeline International Growth   You will find us on stand 36 in the Exhibition

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DWL will be exhibiting at One Nucleus' Genesis 2015 conference in London on Thursday 10th December. The theme of this year's Genesis event is “Taking Bio-Innovation to a Global Market”.

The conference streams cover many topics, including:

  • Deal Structures
  • Empowering Technologies
  • Nurturing an Innovation Pipeline
  • International Growth

 

You will find us on stand 36 in the Exhibition Hall, so please stop by and say hello!

 

For further information, see http://www.genesisconference.com/

 

0Genesis_microsite.jpg2015

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New Arrival: Flavia Di Saverio https://www.dwlanguages.com/new-arrival-flavia-di-saverio/ https://www.dwlanguages.com/new-arrival-flavia-di-saverio/#respond Mon, 09 Nov 2015 12:13:55 +0000 http://www.dwlanguages.com/?p=1518 New Arrival: Flavia Di Saverio If you blinked you could have missed most of 2015 – it’s already November!   We have so much to be thankful for this year: we enjoyed plenty of repeat business and exceeded monthly targets; began important collaborations with new and exciting clients; met our customers face-to-face at exhibitions from

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New Arrival: Flavia Di Saverio

If you blinked you could have missed most of 2015 – it’s already November!

 

We have so much to be thankful for this year: we enjoyed plenty of repeat business and exceeded monthly targets; began important collaborations with new and exciting clients; met our customers face-to-face at exhibitions from Berlin to Baltimore; walked nearly 2.5 million steps between us in Steptember; and as if the year could not improve any further, we are now able to welcome a new assistant project manager who will support the DWL project management team.

Please meet our new arrival: Flavia Di Saverio!

DWL

In keeping with recent tradition, we set up a little Q&A to find out what makes Flavia tick.

Enjoy reading our chat with Flavia, who is already promising to be a very valuable member of the DWL team:

DWL: Where do you call home, Flavia?

Flavia: I call home everywhere I can identify myself with what surrounds me and feel welcome. At the moment, London is definitely my home.

DWL: Which languages can you speak?

FLAVIA: I can speak Spanish, Italian, English and French, although my French is not as fluent as the previous three.

DWL: When did you perform your first ever translation and can you remember what was it about?

FLAVIA: I performed my first translation while I was attending the first year of my BA. I translated a birth certificate from Italian into Spanish for my mother’s friend, who owned a pizzeria. That was meant to be a favour, but I was paid anyway…in pizza!

DWL: What’s the worst translation mistake you ever came across before arriving at DWL?

FLAVIA: I was reading a translation from Italian into English. The text was about a town in Italy called Rimini and its inhabitants, and the translator had completely ignored a cinematographic reference related to a film by Federico Fellini, “I Vitelloni”, which was set in Rimini. This way, the translation lost an important part of its descriptive and poetic aspect.

DWL: What’s your favourite pastime?

FLAVIA: My favourite pastime activities are acting and swimming: one is a safety valve for the soul and mind, the other for releasing the energy from the body.

DWL: Will you make a new year’s resolution for 2016, and what will it be?

FLAVIA: I never make new year's resolutions, though I have the constant goal of trying to improve myself and contribute in a positive way, whichever that is, to the lives of the people who cross my path.

DWL: Who is your hero?

FLAVIA: A hero is someone to look up to for constant inspiration, and for me Charlie Chaplin is that person. He held a deep understanding of life and experienced many of the aspects of the human condition, from poverty to loneliness and fame, and did not feel ashamed, nor kept those parts of his life hidden, portraying them in his works. He was a man who never lost his humbleness, despite his many talents, both human and artistic. As a self-educated writer, he was also very conscious of his lack of schooling. But he loved the word, and to make up for his poor knowledge of the English language, he would keep a dictionary beside him and learn a new word every day. That is the kind of person I would like to be!

Thank you, Flavia!

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